Welcome to the Museum of Fezology!

You have landed at the Virtual Museum of Fezology – a website devoted to that funny little hat known as a “fez!” This site is dedicated to cataloging and displaying examples of fraternal fezzes from all organizations in an effort to create a pictoral reference for collectors and others.

The museum is divided up into several virtual “exhibits” listed above. So, sit back, put on your favorite hat, and start your tour!

Just what is a fez?

Fez (n) – a felt cap having the shape of a truncated cone, ornamented with a tassel. (You can go read more at Wikipedia if you’re looking for a longer definition along with some history!)

About the Museum

The Virtual Museum of Fezology started as a simple hobby. In the fall of 2009, Seth (the owner of the collection) stumbled upon Fez-o-Rama while looking for something fun to wear to a weekly trivia night at the local pub. Being a member of many fraternal organizations, he felt an instant connection with fezzes. His first purchase was a simple black felt fez which he wore to the pub on Halloween of 2009. His obsession had begun. Seth continued to research fezzes, eventually finding the fine folks over at the Order of the Fez (which is now sadly defunct.)

Having been admitted, he purchased his second fez, embroidered with the number “45,” denoting his membership in that organization. He then began purchasing other fezzes as he found them, always wearing them to trivia night, where he quickly became known simply as “the Fez.”

As he collected more and more pieces, he soon realized that there was no definitive source for information on the headwear of fraternal groups, specifically fezzes. He began compiling the information he found in a word document in hopes that it would help with his collection. The next logical step was creating a means so that others might enjoy his collection and perhaps learn a little bit about fraternalism in America, hence the creation of this website.

The goal of this website is to document pieces in Seth’s collection. As new pieces are added, the appropriate exhibits will be updated. Right now, the collection is restricted to fraternal and social groups only. Fezzes worn as part of military uniforms are not of primary interest.

Seth is a member of over a dozen fraternal groups and has spent countless hours researching the fraternal use of fezzes. He lives in central Pennsylvania where he is employed as a communications specialist.